2017-2019 Board Nominees

Become an OSHWA member today to vote on nominees!

This year, we have 3 open seats on the OSHWA board. Board members will hold a 2-year position. Once board members have been chosen by the community, the board will appoint a President, VP, and Secretary. As every nominee answered “Yes” to having 5 hours a month to give to the board, we did not include that question in each nominee’s data. Board responsibilities include fundraising, advising on goals and direction, and carrying out compliance of the organization’s purposes and bylaws. The vote will be open on Oct. 14th through Oct 21st. Members will be emailed a link to vote. Here are the nominees in alphabetical order:

Akiba

Why do you want to be on the board?

I’ve been involved and worked with many nonprofits and NGOs doing projects like monitoring illegal waste dumping, monitoring water quality in the Himalayas, radiation monitoring in Japan, etc. All of those projects have used open source hardware in some form because the designs could be rapidly put together, deployed, and assessed. Crises are becoming the norm and I believe open source hardware will play a crucial role to prevent, mitigate, or assist aid workers and victims during those times. I’d like to give back to the open source hardware community for all the benefits I’ve received as well as help guide OSHW and OSHWA towards more cooperation with nonprofit humanitarian and aid agencies.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I’ve been designing open source hardware for the past ten years and have run an open source hardware company for the same amount of time. I think it’s important for OSHWA board members to understand the value of OSHW and how that translates into commercial value for their companies. I’ve put together or have been involved putting together four hackerspaces (Tokyo Hackerspace, Mothership Hackermoms, Knowledge Garden Dharamsala, and HackerFarm) and understand the importance of building, maintaining, and growing community. I’ve also worked with, consulted, and put together open hardware projects for groups like UNESCO, World Bank, and IAEA and believe that it’s important to reach out and educate NGOs doing important work to the benefits of open source hardware.

Will Caruana

Why do you want to be on the board?

I want to be part of something bigger then my self. I feel that I will add an outside perspective. I don’t work in any industry that produces goods but I live in that maker space of the communitte.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I served as president of a non profit for 5 years it’s the Friends of Wilbraham Public Access. I was the chairmen if the Board Band Committee which was able to set up a municipal corporation that sell fiber optic services to ISP’s. I also love make things currently I like making high voltage projects like my demo fusion reactor which currently produces a ball of plasma in a vacuum. I am also running the fun with high voltage workshop at the Hackaday Superconference because I like helping people learn and work with high voltage.

 

Arielle Hein

Why do you want to be on the board?

I work and engage with a vastly diverse range of different communities, but one of the primary overlaps between these groups is that they all rely heavily on open source tools, hardware in particular. I am extremely passionate about building bridges between the arts and engineering, and making this cross-disciplinary work more accessible to a broad range of makers – to artists and women especially. I love to create, hack, and teach all things open source – but as much as I’m excited about exploring emerging technologies, the thing that drives me most is the way that sharing knowledge is an opportunity to build connections between people. I am excited about the prospect of more direct engagement within the Open Source Hardware community, and eager to assist in continuing to extend the mission of this organization.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

Since my time as a graduate student at ITP NYU, I have worked extensively with Open Source Hardware and have engaged with the community consistently since then. In my current role as an Instructor at the University of Colorado, I teach interaction design and physical computing courses that rely heavily on open source tools. Beyond skill acquisition, my philosophy as an educator focuses on the importance of knowledge sharing, documentation, and collaboration – notions that I will bring to my contributions on the board of OSHWA. I also have extensive community organizing experience through my ongoing work as the Coordinator of ITP Camp. I am a strong communicator (and listener!) and very organized and responsive in all correspondence. I am extremely excited about the opportunity to serve not he OSHWA board and am hopeful to deepen my contributions within this community. I am glad to answer any questions via email from anyone in the community regarding my qualifications or interest in this role!

David Li

Why do you want to be on the board?

I am currently the executive director of Shenzhen Open Innovation Lab which is a government supported platform to promote and facilitate the collaboration between the Shenzhen open hardware ecosystem and the global makers and open source hardware groups. Prior to SZOIL, I also started the research hub Hacked Matter with two collaborators to study global maker movement and open hardware ecosystem in Shenzhen and publish our findings. Shenzhen open hardware ecosystem is currently a 100 billion industry and the insight into how this ecosystem was developed and structured could contribute the future growth of the global open source hardware development.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I have been an open source and free software contributor since 1990 on various of projects. Ardublock I developed in 2012 is one of the most popular graphical development environments for Arduino. I have been doing research in the area of open hardware ecosystem in China since 2011. In my previous role as the director of ObjectWeb an European based open source software consortium in 2003-2006, I contributed to the joint effort between ObjectWeb and major Chinese open source software projects. I can bring new insights to the board and help bridge the global open hardware and the open ecosystem in China.

Narcisse Mbunzama

Why do you want to be on the board?

I want to bring my experience and knowledge on open hardware and related issues with a special view on technical and organizations development. As a citizen of the democratic republic of Congo, I wish to represent the global south in the board, to bring valuable contribution and inputs finally to help achieve the open hardware association mission.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I hold a master degree in computer science and technology innovation and I am a fellow of the international telecommunication union and member of several technology innovation organizations around the world. I’m a serial award winning tech innovator and I conduct researches on standards for open hardware, design of system and related issues. With my background and experience, I personally believe that I am a qualified candidate to join the board and i will bring valuable inputs and contribution in the board.

Joel Murphy

Why do you want to be on the board?
I’ve been a board member of OSHWA since 2015, and now that my two year stint has ended I am once again throwing my hat in the ring to continue serving this great organization. In the last two years, I am proud to have helped steer the creation of the OSHWA Certification. We also made our first formal staff hires, for which I worked on the compensation committee. It has been amazing to watch our community grow. I hope to continue as a board member to ensure that our certification is strong and widely used. It has been a great pleasure to work with the other dedicated board members and it would be an honor to receive your vote to continue giving back to our community at this level.
What qualifies you to be a board member?
I have been a user, maker, and teacher of open-source hardware since 2006. I have co-founded two open-source hardware start-ups, and I’m working on my fourth. I have been to every OSH Summit since 2010 and I have personal and professional relationships with many community members. I taught Physical Computing at Parsons in NYC from 2006 to 2014. During that time I watched the open-source hardware movement explode around me.  Working with students in 2011, I saw an opportunity, and with a friend started World Famous Electronics, maker of the Pulse Sensor, an optical heart rate monitor for makers and researchers. That foray into bio-sensing lead me to co-found OpenBCI, makers of low cost, open-source EEG amplifiers for neuroscience research and education. In addition to these endeavors, I’m am also working with a team to create and commercialize open-source hearing aids and hearing aid development tools. 5 of my projects are now OSHWA certified. I’m committed to increasing the awareness of OSHWA, growing our organization and continuing to support our mission.

Chris Osterwood

Why do you want to be on the board?

I am a longtime user of Open Source Hardware and have benefited from it greatly. I want to return that favor and help others benefit from OSHW. I’m a mechanical engineer by training and I chose that educational path because I was fascinated and captivated by the mechanical world. I gained tremendous design insight and experience by taking apart my toys as a child — in fact my favorite store sold broken junk by the pound. Being able to see how my toys worked gave me interest in designing new products. Since college, I’ve learned electrical design through study of open source hardware schematics, bills of materials, and design journals. I now see that I’m repeating my childhood but in digital circuit design — learning new skills and design strategies by interrogating what others have made. And without OSHW, without published schematics, this kind of interrogation and subsequent learning is much more difficult. What I’ve learned has allowed me to start my own company, Capable Robot Components, which will be releasing a line of OSHW products aimed at changing the make vs buy decisions that makers of unmanned ground robots currently face. I want to be on the OSHWA board to further its mission and to help others benefit from OSHW as I have.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I’m not sure quite how to answer this question. But, I understand and am interested in organization building — for example I’m on the steering committee of the Pittsburgh Robotics Network, which is becoming a 501c6 organization. I am embracing OSHW with the products I’m designing at my company. I have functional knowledge in hardware design, embedded software, web software, marketing, and law. I enjoy teaching and speaking — I’ve given talks on law & robots (Practicing Law Institute) and how we tested 3D sensors at my previous company (Embedded Vision Summit and ROSCON). I listen. I try to make well reasoned decisions.

Jeff Paranich

Why do you want to be on the board?

My low-level coding interests for the past 20 years have led me to hardware design, and the colossal reward of holding a tangible, physical item, in your hands that can be shared with others to extend upon and use in their designs. While programming low-level in itself is still fulfilling, the thought that everyday consumers can build their own commercial grade products with all the distributor resources available today is truly phenomenal. Curiously, the knowledge that such a movement exist is not known by the general population. One simply envisions big factories, assembly lines, and blue-chip organizations being the sole innovator and originator; when in reality there are compelling and pioneering designs being done by small organizations and private individuals in their own homes. I believe this is a tragic mindset; the homebrew and maker community was strong in the eighties, there was a general knowledge it existed by all and anticipation of an upcoming wave to pave the future to new technology. I can attest that today open hardware has, and will continue to gain, a lot of momentum – and is strongest it has been in two decades – but may continue to be eclipsed by large organizations that keep much of their business proprietary. Canada, my home country, has a very strong post-secondary system; world-class Computer Science and Engineering schools, however outside of BioWare and BlackBerry there has not been much traction in STEM corporations, small business’, nor makers in the nation, I believe due in part to organizations such as OSHWA not having a strong enough presence to inform and encourage innovation and open source/hardware from early on and to general masses. Thus, I desire to be on the board to expand awareness of the Open Source Hardware Association and inform and educate those who are not aware of what it represents. I pledge to attend fairs or events, fundraise well beyond the expected $300 as it is not enough, and provide meaningful input on the Board of Director meetings. I also believe the best protection for OSHWA’s future is committing resources to youth at early ages, expanding their mind into hardware before they move onto post-secondary or private studies – even presenting hardware as a valid field of self-study that can merit much personal success with all the open source resources available today. OSHWA is the strongest association and best bet right now to incite change, grow the movement further, and ensure the hardware community story remains a rich and colorful one. It would be an absolute honor to be part of the team and ensure its continued success.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I hold dual degrees from the University of Alberta- Bachelor of Science in Computer Science & Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Mathematics, with a minor in Business. I have been a projects controls manager for over two billion dollars in heavy oil projects; managing revenue, cost, margins, scheduling and progress completion. When I am not managing projects, I am designing hardware in my workshop. My most common projects typically involve power supplies, FPGA boards, video processing ADC/DAC boards, and audio amplifiers. Furthermore, I have coded a multitude of company software programs – software as simple as employee in/out of office interfaces, to estimating software for piping fabrication, to invoicing software which neared that of a full ERP system. I have a thorough knowledge of C++, C and the Unix tool set (Awk, Sed, etc), and believe in the Unix philosophy of building simple, short, clear, modular, and extensible code that can be easily maintained and repurposed by developer’s other than its creators. I can operate under tight deadlines and sometimes unrealistic deliverables, accepting the challenge and looking forward to the feeling of reward once finished. Lastly, I am co-founder of a successful videography company in Alberta (J&C Media Corporation), managing employees and finances and scheduling – also doing occasional filming myself in the field for corporate and private events. All said my past is very multi-faceted, I have a multitude of exposure to many elements at various business levels and have been successful to date with a clear, structured framework to how I approach things and would apply all my techniques to ensure the continued success of the Open Source Hardware Association.

Nick Poole

Why do you want to be on the board?

I’ve always been a proponent of OSHW and other Free and Open initiatives and I believe I finally have the free time and bandwidth to get involved with steering the ship. I’m also interested in talking to other board members and learning from their perspectives.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I’ve worked for SparkFun Electronics for almost 7 years where I’ve had the opportunity to see open hardware from a number of perspectives: as a marketing professional, a community discussion leader, and a designer and maintainer of open hardware projects. I believe that my work experience combined with my unique personal perspective and affinity for facilitating and mediating discussions could make me a valuable member of the board.

OSHWA 2017-2019 Board Nominations Open!

OSHWA is looking for 3 new faces to join the board of directors for the Open Source Hardware Association. The nominee form is for self-nominations only. Please fill out the nominee form (deactivated October 14) to become a nominee or forward the link to someone you want to nominate. Do not fill out the form for someone else. The purpose of this form is to tell voting members why you want to serve on the OSHWA board. We will be publish the nominees and their answers on Oct. 14th. Board members hold a 2-year position. Once board members have been chosen by the community, the board will appoint a President, VP, and Secretary. Board responsibilities include fundraising, advising on goals and direction, and carry out compliance with the organizations purposes and bylaws. See the board member agreement to get a sense of the responsibilities. Board members are expected to adhere to the board attendance policy and come prepared having read the board packet. Board members are expected to spend 5-10 hours of time per month on OSHWA. Nominees can meet current board members who are present at the Summit on Oct. 5th to ask questions or submit questions to info@oshwa.org. Nominations will be open until Oct. 12th.

Member voting will take place Oct. 14-21. Want to vote in the election? Become a member! Please note that only individuals can vote, corporate members cannot.

 

Open Hardware Summit 2017 Hotel Rooms and post-summit events

We are only a few months out from this years OHSummit! This year we will be hosting the annual gathering in the Rocky Mountain region in beautiful Denver, Colorado. Denver is home to several startups and projects built around the open source ethos with a thriving community to support the movement. If you are interested in finding out more about some of the local open source culture, be sure to check out the new events page here!

We are excited to announce that ART Hotel, adjacent to this year’s venue, is working with us to provide discounted rates for their rooms! Find out more information here.

Don’t forget there are still tickets and sponsorship places available as well!

Hope to see everyone in Denver!

OSHWA Keynote at the Red Hat Summit

Open Source Stories invited  Alicia Gibb,  Executive Director of the Open Source Hardware Association to give a keynote presentation at the Red Hat Summit in Boston last week.

Alicia Gibb’s keynote The Physical Future of Open Source

Gibb’s talk was entitled ‘The Physical Future of Open Source’. The talk was a primer on Open Source Hardware and the future possibilities of communities working together. In her talk, she said: “The more we band together, the more the world becomes open source. If we dream of an Open source world, the world includes physical products. We need to be thinking more holistically. ”

Alicia Gibb talks open source hardware

“For this open source future to happen, combining open software and open hardware, we need help from all communities asking themselves is there an open source alternative out there? when wen working on projects”, said Gibb.

Gibb talked about suspending reality and the future of open source hardware

Gibb talked about “atoms vs. bits” and the difference included in source from hardware to software: “Currently the open source hardware community doesn’t include the atomic layer in their source, for example where the copper comes from. When we talk about the source of hardware, we suspend reality a bit to include the important parts of the source to recreate the hardware, but raw materials are not considered something worth listing by the open hardware community at this point.”

She spoke about the future of open source hardware. “With more research, 3D printers could print entire components, or turn into desktop chip fabs – if people can create chips at home, they will share files and the IC industry will need to open source chips to stay relevant, whereas currently almost all ICs are closed.”

OSHWA is grateful for the opportunity to spread the word that open source hardware has a definition, a certification mark, and open hardware options exist in the world.

Ada Lovelace Fellowship Applications Now Open

The Ada Lovelace Fellowship encourages women, LGBTA+, and/or other minorities in the open technology movement to both participate and nurture an incredible, diverse community within open source.

For the fifth year running, we are ecstatic to offer TEN (10) Open Hardware Fellowships to members of the community. This includes travel assistance and entrance to the 2017 open Hardware Summit!

We are at an exciting point in time for open source and hope to encourage everyone, no matter their walk in life, to embrace and participate in this incredible movement!

Announcing the 2017 Open Hardware Summit!

 

The Open Source Hardware Association, a 501(c)3 non-profit, is excited to announce the 2017 Open Hardware Summit taking place October 5th, 2017 in Denver, Colorado. This is the annual gathering of the OSHWA organization and open hardware community. Through the Open Hardware Summit, we aim to create an inclusive welcoming environment to empower people in all stages of discovering open source technology.

The Open Hardware Summit is where anyone and everyone can participate and collaborate in the open source community!

GET YOUR TICKETS HERE!
Don’t forget to check your email for your 10% discount if you have a general membership or above at OSHWA!
Considering Sponsoring this year?

At this time we are opening the call for companies or individuals interested in sponsoring this year’s summit. More information can be found here.

For the fifth year running, we are ecstatic to offer up TEN (10) Open Hardware Fellowships to members of the community. This includes travel assistance and entrance to the 2017 open Hardware Summit!

The Ada Lovelace Fellowship encourages women, LGBTA+, and/or other minorities in the open technology movement to both participate and nurture an incredible, diverse community within open source.
Looking for other ways to are other options to support and participate in the movement? You can help by:
  • Sharing information on individual and corporate memberships with friends and colleagues
  • Using our guidelines to certify projects or products as a form of standardized open hardware
  • Participating on social media outlets (like Twitter and Facebook) to keep the conversation going and spread news of the summit
  • Last, but far from least, donating to our 501(c)3 (be sure to remember that some companies match gift amounts their employees make to a non-profit! This doubles the distance that gifts will go!!)

The OSHWA Forums: Now Powered by Discourse

We are very pleased to announce that our new community forums are up and running. The discussion forums are powered by Discourse, which is easy to use, easy to maintain, and open source.

Among other new features, Discourse offers the ability to follow and reply to topics via email. This was one of the biggest reasons we decided to migrate our forums from their old home on bbPress. We’re hoping this will breathe some life into what has otherwise been an admittedly dormant part of the site.

All of the topics, replies, and user accounts have been imported from bbPress, but you’ll need to reset your password in order to log in on the new system.

Hope to see you there!

OSHWA is Officially a Non-Profit Organization!

Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) is thrilled to announce we have just received our official non-profit status! To celebrate this honor, we are launching a Membership Campaign to double our members of like-minded individuals and companies between now and December 31, 2014.

You can actively support open source hardware by becoming a member of OSHWA. Membership gives you visibility within the community for yourself and/or your company. Membership also allows you to vote on the organization’s board members and create positive momentum within the larger open source movement. How cool is that? Additional benefits include fun schwag like stickers, and a discount to all OSHWA events. Members receive priority access to events which typically sell out in the community, such as the Open Hardware Summit.

Now that we are a non-profit, your membership gift is tax-deductible. Until now, our generous supporters have made financial contributions to enable our work because they truly believe in what we do. We could not be more appreciative.

OSHWA aims to be the voice of the open hardware community, ensuring that technological knowledge is accessible to everyone. We encourage the collaborative development of technology that serves education, environmental sustainability, and human welfare.

When you join as a member or make an additional donation, your tax-deductible support allows us to:

  • Organize conferences and community events
  • Pay for travel so women and people of color who would not otherwise be able to attend our annual Summit Conference are able to do so
  • Create educational initiatives for the public on topics around open source hardware and its long-term impact on innovation
  • Organize the open source hardware movement around shared values and principles
  • Facilitate STEM education through the use of open source hardware conferences and other events
  • Collect, compile, and publish data on the open source hardware movement and communities of practice.

Feel free to reach out to info@oshwa.org with any questions/thoughts/ideas about collaboration.

Don’t forget: Some awesome companies will match a gift their employees make to a non-profit. Please check if yours is one of them. That will allow your gift to go twice as far.

If you made a contribution retroactive to the date of OSHWA’s incorporation on May 25, 2012, contributions made after that date are tax deductible to the extent permitted by law.

 

OSHWA Board Nominees

We have 14 board nominees for the 5 open seats on the OSHWA board. This post is going to get a little a long, so for sanity here’s a PDF spreadsheet of the nominees. As every nominee answered Yes to having 5 hours a month to give to the board, we did not include that question in each nominee’s data. As our bylaws state, members holding an individual membership will get to vote in the 5 new board seats, corporations do not get a vote. The vote will be open Sept. 6th-7th. Members will be emailed a link to vote. Here are the nominees in random order:

Name: Star Simpson

Why do you want to be on the board?

I care a lot about hardware and its openness, and I’d like to be a part of supporting its future. Open hardware is important to me because I feel there is nothing more powerful than being enabled to learn and create. And when we share knowledge, we all become more so enabled.What qualifies you to be a board member?

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

Not currently.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I make hardware (largely based around electronics — http://starsimpson.com to see more). I have also cared about open source hardware for quite a long time — I ran the session to discuss a future open hardware license at Foo Camp in 2009. Before that I was president of MIT’s hackerspace, MITERS, where I introduced countless fellow undergrads to the joys of building hardware there.

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

Yes

Name: Bryant Patten

Why do you want to be on the board?

Open Hardware represents a huge opportunity for transforming both K-12 education and moving people from passive consumers to active makers. The OSHWA is at the center of this emerging group and is doing the key foundational work to keep the movement healthy and expanding. I would like to help that process in any way possible.

I mean…who wouldn’t want chance to hang out with all these cool people?

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

Open 1-to-1, Board Member
Open IT Lab, Advisor
Global Education Open Technology Foundation, Board Member

What qualifies you to be a board member?

As the founder of the National Center for Open Source and Education, I have spent the last 10 years advocating for Open Source (software, hardware and data) in schools. I have been an invited speaker at conferences around the world as well as consulting with a variety of clients regarding Open Source issues. Finally, I have started several companies, backed 52 Kickstarter projects and built what may have been the world’s first Internet-connected, arduino-monitored elementary school compost pile.

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

Yes.

Name: Marudhachalamurthi

Why do you want to be on the board?

To share my knowledge and guide the team to achieve the organization’s goal.

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

No. I am new to the board

What qualifies you to be a board member?

Work as Techincal Head and CTO for many organisations

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

Yes

Name: Alfredo Herrera

Why do you want to be on the board?

I have been following with interest the evolution of OSHWA, and it is very exciting. I became aware of open source hardware when it was presented as the method to be used by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) in its humanitarian initiatives launched in 2008: to make available Humanitarian Technology designs as open source for the benefit of humanity.
I am nominating myself to the board because I want to put my industry and volunteering experience to work for the benefit of the association. Also, I would like to make available my IEEE network to the benefit of the association to hopefully bring closer together the normalizing activities of the IEEE with the growth efforts of OSHWA. I see a lot of potential benefits to both organizations from a closer association; but I also believe that I have to first commit to learning from the more senior members of OSHWA.

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

No. Although I have volunteered actively at the IEEE, I am not part of their board nor any other.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I believe my 16+ years of experience in large telecom organizations (Nortel/Ericsson), and 16+ years of volunteering for the IEEE has trained me for such a role. I am currently a member of the Steering Committee of IEEE’s Special Interest Group on Humanitarian Technology (SIGHT), and this may enable me to extend the reach of OSHWA to a new population:
http://www.ieee.org/special_interest_group_on_humanitarian_technnology.html

I have also served as:
* vice-chair (2005-2011) and chair (2011-2013) of the IEEE Ottawa chapter of the Technology Management Council.
* Secretary (2008) of the IEEE Ottawa section.
* chair (2007) of the IEEE Workshop on Accelerating Computationally Intensive Applications
* Founder (2009) and chair (2010-2012) of the IEEE Canada Humanitarian Initiatives Committee.

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

No

Name: Max Whitney

Why do you want to be on the board?

I’m a big fan of the Open Source Hardware Association. That’s the fundamental reason. I think open source hardware can be as transformative of devices as open source software has been for code. I’ve been a member at the Brooklyn hackerspace NYC Resistor since the first lease was signed. I’ve watched how having community, workspace and open information has made previously unattainable projects come into being, from 3D printers to telephone controlled pneumatic robotic arms.

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

I do not.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

There are three sets of experiences that qualify me to be an effective member of the OSHWA board. As the manager of a technology department at a university I’ve learned to navigate politics and budgets at a large non-profit. As a member of the technology and product review boards for the Sakai Foundation (now the Apereo Foundation) I successfully fostered common cause among widely disparate constituencies, including universities, schools and private vendors. As a member of NYC Resistor I’ve learned how to create a healthy community based on consensus.

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

No

Name: Matt Joyce

Why do you want to be on the board?

I believe the Open Source Hardware can work. I believe it is a necessity for some industries to begin to move forward in their own natural economic evolutions.

I’ve always believed that the evolution of technology is very much an organic process. I like using the tree analogy when discussing the importance of Open Source in the market place. When technology is new it sprouts like a fresh new leaf. It’s green, it needs lots of sunlight, and it may not survive for very long. It’s like any good startup. But as that technology matures and grows in use, it turns into a branch. From it sprouts more new technology. And eventually those technologies become their own branches. By that time the technology is a trunk technology from which many branches have grown. Trunk technologies need to be open, standardized, and free for them to be healthy. And their health is a necessity for all the branches and leaves upon which they are depended.

I’d like to help get that point across to folks who maybe don’t understand the importance of OSHW just yet.

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

Not at this time. In fact, I am not sure anything I’ve ever sat on could be called a ‘board’.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I’ve got significant background in Open Source. I have been involved with the OpenStack foundation since before it’s inception having worked on the team at NASA that built the nova project and formed with rackspace to create the project.

I’ve build hardware, but I’ve got no financial incentives that will color my decisions as they relate to OSHWA. I keep an open mind, and I prefer numbers to opinions.

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

No

Name: Emile Petrone

Why do you want to be on the board?

Through Tindie, I’m supporting most likely the most open products of anyone (we are approaching 1,000 products and 300 makers). We have a vested interest in the success of open hardware and have built our business around supporting this philosophy.

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

No

What qualifies you to be a board member?

The lessons learned from being the CEO and founder of Tindie. I’ve seen hundreds of projects go from an open design to a physical device. The lessons from those experiences I think is invaluable to OSHWA, and members looking to take a project to market.

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

No

Name: Far MCKon

Why do you want to be on the board?

I think OHSWA needs to continue growing, and find a way to become a standards setting organization, much the way IEEE has. I have watched as terms like ‘Organic’ and ‘Whole Foods’ have been perverted because there is no organization at all calling out those who demean or dement the terms.

I think there needs to be some stick (and/or Bad Cop) as part of OSHWA to call out bad actors in our community in a respectful and clear way, and to help set a standard for interoperability, community support, and growth is.

My main interest would be to work to create a OSHWA Bronze/Silver/Gold/Platinum ranking/branding system and partner system. This would work by legally defining several of Phil T’s ‘Unwritten Rules of Open Source’ and would be used as a positive branding solution to highlight the best players in our community.

I would also like to create a ‘OSHWA awards’ to run anti-seasonal to OHS, so there is a spring celebration to keep open source in the related news.

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

I have been on the board of several organizations (RocWiki.org, Ant Hill Cooperative, The Hacktory, and Hive76), but am not currently on other boards.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I have a depth of experience in Cooperatives, Hackerspaces, and in running operations for a small business. I understand the incentives of the passion driven developer, as well as the needs of a small business owner/manager.

I also have a clear project I want to accomplish to help grow the OSHWA. I would mostly like to join the board, get the operations set up for the membership/ratings system, create the awards system and host the first awards or two, and finally retire and move on to some other cool idea.

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

No

Name: Jeffrey Warren

Why do you want to be on the board?

Open hardware and open hardware culture are bringing the kind of disruptive change we’ve seen in FOSS to new areas, and I’m cautiously optimistic about its ability to effect widespread change outside the hyper-online crowd. But it’s going to need a broader focus than many of the (still exciting) initial projects which have defined “open hardware” — beyond circuit boards and 3D printing to encompass areas such as agriculture, environmental science, health, and others which have a direct impact on the every day lives of billions. This is already happening, and I want to be part of defining and shaping what open hardware means — and in particular its social, political, and environmental aspects. There’s a great deal of work to be done to make OH more inclusive and to encourage its use to further the agency, equality, and capabilities of all kinds of people, and to inspire young new open hardware contributors to see these technologies as a means to achieve those goals.

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

I’m on the advisory board for the WeGov project (http://techpresident.com/topics/wegov).

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I’m a co-founder of the Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (publiclab.org) and have spent a lot of time in the past few years collaborating with hundreds of other Public Lab contributors on open hardware projects. One of my focuses has been to explore and implement a “starter kit” strategy where the Public Lab nonprofit assembles, sells, and distributes DIY kits for several of our major open hardware projects, in order to promote our community’s work, recruit new members, standardize open hardware platforms, and develop a sustainable funding source for the nonprofit’s community programs. This has meant developing retail channels and branding and packaging for tools which remain community-driven and supported, and improving how these objects speak to and support our mission and our open source ethos.

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

No

Name: Gabriella Levine

Why do you want to be on the board? 

I am 100% passionate about sharing information to fuel innovation. I am dedicated to working on Open Hardware projects, most significant current work is Protei inc, Open Hardware shape-shifting sailing vessels to explore and preserve oceans, and sneel (sneel.cc), and as a means to explore and define what is Open HW and what is its potential. I have recently worked with many entrepreneurs on the accelerator “Unreasonable at Sea” to define a sustainable business model for Protei, as well as working with Andrew Katz to define a CERN license derivative that will apply to Protei, so I am well versed not only in the technology but also the legal / business implications of OSHW. I am extremely committed to good documentation, sharing knowledge, teaching others to work and engage with design solutions using OSHW (especially arduino , rasp pi, etc) through workshops or courses. I post on Instructables often [http://www.instructables.com/member/gabriellalevine/ ] and my own blog www.levinegabriella.com/category/ongoing/ ]

My biggest passion for work lies in experimenting [coding, wiring etc] on projects using new & appropriated open hardware electronics [beaglebone, rasp pi, arduino due] see my recent post on OSHW fueling innovation: http://tedxnavesink.com/fueling-innovation-through-shared-technology/

I just returned from teaching “exploring biomimetic interfaces” at CIID in copenhagen but a big focus on the course was using OSHW and what its impact is, potential business models, and GOOD DOCUMENTATION: http://www.levinegabriella.com/exploringbiomimicry/ciid
and I will be teaching a similar course at ITP this Fall.

A lot more about me:
I am a creative technologist and open-source hardware designer interested in the relationship between technology and ecology. I create sculptural and robotic works that mimic environmental phenomena and animal behavior. I design modular Open Hardware toolkits for biomimetic robots for environmental exploration and preservation, and to explore how shared information fuels innovation. I am passionate about sharing information, biomimetic robots, PCB’s, electromechanical actuation, wireless sensor networks, coding, good documentation, and inventing creative solutions.

I am COO of Protei Inc, Open Hardware robotic morphological sailboats to clean and explore the oceans, and inventor of Sneel, robotic swimming snakes to explore unknown territories.

I just returned from a radical experiment, circumnavigating the world by boat. I was a Fellow of the Unreasonable at Sea accelerator, exposing Protei to 14 different ports worldwide, while innovating through a design-based approach of the Stanford d. School, through field research, user-testing, design thinking, and hands-on engagement. On the journey, I led global hackathons centered around the topic of building DIY aquatic robots.

I studied Biology and Piano at Cornell University and Oberlin College, then worked doing Cancer Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine before abandoning the lab for the outdoors to become a wildland fire fighter based in Oregon. I hold a Masters degree in Design and Technology from ITP, Tisch School of the Arts, NYU.

Since 2010, I have exhibited work internationally including Ars Electronica, MIT Media Lab, Meta.Morf Electronic Arts Biennial (Norway), and the American Museum of Natural History. I received the 2012 Prix Ars Electronica Hybrid Arts Award, the first Artist in Residence at Instructables, the NYU Task Force Green Grant, and the Gulfstream Navigator Savannah $100K Ocean Exchange Grant. I teach Biomimetic Design courses as a visiting professor at CIID (Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design), and adjunct professor at ITP. I have presented globally at symposia and lectures including the Open Hardware Summit 2011 (NYC), Startup Festival (Bangalore), and Unreasonable at State (US State Department), and soon at TEDxNavesink on “Open Hardware Fueling Innovation and Global Adventures with Open Hardware Robots”. My work has been written up in Wired, InHabitat, HyperAllergic, CNN, Vice Magazine, NY1, and Scientific American.

I freelance as a creative coder, and I am organizing DARC civilian Drone conference in NYC in October.

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

>>Ocean Exchange advisory board: http://www.oceanexchange.org/ [the ocean exchange supported protei through a 100K grant that I was awarded last year, sponsored by Gulfstream]
>>Director & President of Open H2O: http://open-h2o.org/user?destination=home [open source hardware for the oceans, dedicated to proliferating new open technologies for marine exploration and preservation]
>>COO & on BOD of Protei Inc (protei.org) , shape shifting, open hardware, robotic sailing vessels for ocean preservation and exploration

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I am extremely organized, and I am extremely knowledgeable about OSHW, projects, and OSHW’s implications in business. I have experience building and running companies [open h2o and protei], I have experience doing community development around OSHW projects, as well as many remote meetings via skype to organize, plan, and move ahead with logistical changes to set up companies. I am flexible, cooperative, available, and passionate about working with a team of directors to support OSHWA and move it forward in the most appropriate direction. I am passionate, rational, and impartial, and I believe that I can drive the organization forwards while listening to everyone’s opinions equally. I am good at stepping back and hearing everyone’s wishes and desires, but I am also good at keeping track of time and trying to cooperate to make group decisions in a timely fashion.

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

Yes

Name: Alexander Vail

Why do you want to be on the board?

I am a young maker who works for an RC toy company, where I do things like 3d print robots, research new products for us to carry, and build cool things for my bosses. I believe that OSHW is incredibly important for the rapid evolution in technology, and if it becomes the prevalent type of hardware, humans will be able to achieve greater things more rapidly. I see some really amazing things happening with OSHW right now, and wish to contribute more back to the community.

Although none of my work can be shared with the community (yet), I have been showing a lot of my friends about Arduino, 3d printing, automated multirotors (think drones), and whatever else peaks their interests. I want to spread OSHW to young children and show them that the future does not involve patents and copyrights and publishing companies, but does involve innovation, sharing, and freedom to hack, create, and play.

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

I do not serve on any board for any other organization.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

What qualifies anyone to be a board member? I believe the people on this board are people who are passionate about OSHW, and they want to help spread OSHW so that people can know how awesome it is to share, create, and play! That is what I want to do, in fact, that is what I do! I just want to contribute my energy to the community to work with the community to spread it in a higher amplitude!

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

Yes

Name: Zak Homuth

Why do you want to be on the board?

With Michael Woodworth and Stephen Hamer, we created Upverter because we truly believe in the power of open source hardware.

Hobbyists and professional all over the world create awesome pieces of design and great devices. Historically it has been a long and tortuous process. The tools were not adapted, expensive and limited. And there was no place to share ideas and useful pieces of design.

For too long the hardware hackers were not able to collaborate, exchange feedbacks / reviews / advices because they were isolated. And collaboration was totally nonexistent for decades.

We decided to create tools to make hardware creation easier and connect people to help hardware designers achieve their ultimate goal: bring innovative ideas to life and make the world a better place.

I want to be on the board and do everything I can to help and support the hardware open source movement, the maker revolution, and the admirable and dedicated hardware hackers who create new devices and share their work with the community.

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

Yes, on the board of Upverter.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I am the CEO of Upverter. Open source hardware is in our DNA. I am a former electrical engineer and a passionate hardware open source designer. I work every day with the team to make hardware creation smoother, easier and faster.

We decided to give our tools for free to hackers willing to share their work with the rest of the world. This is our promise. And I want to do as much as I can to support this community of awesome people!

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

Yes

Name: Amnon Aliphas

Why do you want to be on the board?

Networking

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

ITT Technical Institute school of Electronics

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I am an experienced entrepreneur, founder of DSPWorld and TechOnline (both companies acquired by UBM).

I am also the Chair of the School of Electronics in Wilmington, MA

and I have a Ph.D. in EE from Stanford University

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

No

Name: David Mellis

Why do you want to be on the board?

I’m interested in developing and promoting open-source hardware in a number of different ways:

1. Collecting and sharing best practices for open-source hardware and promoting it as a strategy for product development.

2. Continuing to extend open-source hardware to domains beyond electronic circuit boards: e.g. machines, furniture, consumer products, etc.

3. Promoting personal manufacturing that builds on and contributes to open-source hardware, particularly by exploring strategies for handling regulations (e.g. FCC or USB) that pose difficulties for small-volume production.

4. Improving the legal basis for open-source hardware, both through the continued development of open-source hardware licenses and through the development of strategies for handling patents and open-source hardware.

Do you currently serve on the boards of other organizations?

No.

What qualifies you to be a board member?

I have experience with open-source hardware on both a practical and theoretical level. As a co-founder of the Arduino electronics prototyping platform, I’ve seen first-hand the opportunities and challenges of open-source hardware. As a PhD student at the MIT Media Lab, I’ve been developing open-source consumer electronic products and publishing research on open-source hardware.

I’ve also been closely involved with the Open Source Hardware Association and its precursors. I helped to draft the open-source hardware statement of principles and definition and to edit the OSHWA frequently-asked questions and best practices document. I was the review chair for the Open Hardware Summit in 2011 and 2012, helping to shape the program for the event. I helped to compose the open-source hardware community survey.

In short, I’ve been deeply involved in both open-source hardware and the Open-Source Hardware Association, giving me the experience to help them prosper in the future.

Do you have an interest in serving as the board President?

No

Open Hardware Summit: Call for Papers Extended

OHS 2012

Good news if you’re still working on— or haven’t yet started —your proposal for this year’s Open Hardware Summit: The call for papers has been extended, so you’ve got another week to fine tune your talk, poster, or demo proposal.

Submissions are now due by JUNE 28, 2013.

The Open Hardware Summit is the world’s first comprehensive conference on open hardware; a venue to discuss and draw attention to the rapidly growing Open Source Hardware movement.  This year’s summit takes place on September 6 at MIT.